Improving educational opportunities for looked after young people

a good practice guide for teachers
  • 46 Pages
  • 0.70 MB
  • 1059 Downloads
  • English
by
National Children"s Bureau , London
StatementPeter J. Sandiford.
ContributionsNational Children"s Bureau.
The Physical Object
Pagination46p. ;
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL22379404M
ISBN 101874579938
OCLC/WorldCa607587932

This knowledge review investigates what works in improving educational outcomes for looked after children and young people.

It is based on a rapid review of the research literature involving systematic searching, analysis of key data, validated local practice examples and views from people who use services and service providers.

Description Improving educational opportunities for looked after young people FB2

Our looked after children and young people face more challenges than most but when they feel safe, secure, cared for and happy, looked after children can thrive and succeed. We have come a long way in recent years in improving the outcomes for our looked after children and young people -there is good work underway across Scotland – but.

Supporting the educational progress of children and young people in foster care: challenges and opportunities Article (PDF Available) March with 1, Reads How we measure 'reads'. Despite a proliferation of legislative action in response to differential outcomes, the relative educational, employment and lifecourse disadvantages of individuals who have experienced the care system remains a pressing issue of widespread international concern.

In Wales, a significant body of work has been undertaken on, and with, care experienced children and young : Dawn Mannay, Alyson Rees, Louise Roberts. education plans and designated teachers are having a positive effect on the educational experiences of looked-after children and young people.

Details Improving educational opportunities for looked after young people FB2

However, statistics for looked-after children in education still remain well below national averages: “At 30 Sept in England, 68% of children looked-after continuously for at least Support for looked after children should begin with a thorough assessment of their emotional and mental health needs.

Give children and young people voice and influence. Looked after children and young people need more opportunities to identify what is important to them and influence their own care. Support and sustain children’s relationships. Improving educational outcomes for poor children 2.

High-poverty schools lack the capacity to substantially improve student learning, independent of financial re-sources. Potential solutions to this problem would in-volve helping schools improve the quality of their stan-dard operating practices, or increasing the instructional. on improving the educational achievement of young people in care and to the prepa- ration of this special issue, composed of papers revised and peer-reviewed after the conference.

Children and young people should be treated as individuals: It is important to think about the whole range. of a young person’s strengths and difficulties. Professionals need to listen to children and young people: Young people who don’t want to be in a placement are less likely to succeed there.

The role of the Virtual School Head for looked after children. All councils have to appoint a Virtual School Head to be the lead responsible officer for making sure that arrangements are in place to improve the educational experiences and outcomes of looked after children, including those placed out of county.

This term typically denotes children cared for by Government, though exact definitions vary between the four nations. More t children in the UK are in care, 70, in England.

Most are taken into care over fears of abuse or neglect. They are vulnerable to health inequalities, and exhibit significantly higher rates of mental health issues, emotional disorders (anxiety and depression.

This summary comes from an original systematic review called: Systematic review of educational interventions for looked-after children and young people: Recommendations for intervention development and evaluation (Evans, R., Brown, R., Rees, G., Smith, P.) Published Putting Children First: Combating Vulnerability and Improving Outcomes for Looked After Children Enquiries: @PublicPolicyEx Overview Over the last eight years, the number of Looked After Children (LAC) increased f in to 73, byof whom only about 6% are likely to go.

Ensure that educational provision for looked-after children and young people (including those placed out of area) is appropriate and of high quality, in line with statutory regulations (Promoting the education of looked after children: statutory guidance for local authorities Department for Children, Schools and Families).

Young people who are Looked After often have access to and use supports specifically provided for them when they cease to be Looked After between the ages of 16 to The planning for this commences prior to the young person ceasing to be Looked After and, as such, all involved in the young person’s life whilst Looked After should contribute.

Looked after children are some of the most vulnerable and socially excluded in society. Children and young people frequently enter the looked after system as a consequence of abuse and neglect and they bring a high level of need with them including poor mental and physical health (Mooney et al., ).There is considerable evidence of poor long‐term outcomes for looked after children with Cited by: 3.

Looked After Children (Children in Care) Policy Rationale Schools are key in helping to raise the educational standards and improving the life chances of looked after children, and in tackling the causes of social exclusion through careful planning, monitoring and evaluation.

This guideline covers how organisations, professionals and carers can work together to deliver high quality care, stable placements and nurturing relationships for looked-after children and young people. It aims to help these children and young people reach their full potential and enjoy the same opportunities in life as their peers.

Rethinking reasons behind lower educational outcomes of looked after children For example, in order to encourage the young people and boost their self-esteem, celebratory events were held, where children were rewarded with certificates for achievements such as improved school attendance.

my research supports the notion that there is a. acting as an advocate for looked after children in order to allow them equal access to educational opportunities and support with important decisions affecting future life chances The designated teacher will set up systems to monitor and record the progress of all looked after children.

The Benefits and Challenges of Collaborative Multi-Agency Working This chapter describes: • The latest research findings on how schools are implementing ECM and engaging collaboratively with other services and agencies • The benefits of multi-agency partnership working within educational settingsFile Size: KB.

Given the delays that looked after children experience in getting parental consent for school trips and activities, we will aim to ensure that looked after children enjoy the same extra-curricular opportunities as other children by reserving placements for them on trips or on activities.

If you want to be part of improving the lives and life chances of children in care then, quite simply, this book is essential reading.

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--Emeritus Professor Andrew Pithouse, Cardiff School of Social Sciences This edited volume draws together a significant body of research in Wales concerning care experienced children and young cturer: University of Wales Press. Analysis of outcomes for children and young people 4 to 5 years after a final Care Order Authors: Katy Burch, Jackie Daru, and Vivien Taylor at the Institute of Public Care, Oxford Brookes University Views expressed in this report are those of the researcher and not necessarily those of the Welsh Government For further information please contact:File Size: 1MB.

It is a statutory requirement under the Children and Young Persons Act to appoint a designated teacher to promote the educational achievement of looked after children who are on the school roll. The teacher should provide an annual report to the governing body who should also appoint a member to oversee the provision and work with the teacher to champion the needs of children in care.

Get this from a library. Children and Young People 'Looked After'?: Education, Intervention and the Everyday Culture of Care in Wales. [Dawn Mannay; Louise Roberts; Alyson Rees;] -- Despite a proliferation of legislative action in response to differential outcomes, the relative educational, employment and lifecourse disadvantages of individuals who have experienced the care.

It aims to ensure looked-after children have access to any physical or mental health care they may need. Statutory guidance is issued by law; you must follow it. children and young people looked after. The majority of these children are in care as a result of birth families being unable to provide a level of care that meets their emotional and well-being needs.

Children and young people who are in or have experienced care remain one of the lowest performing groups in terms of educational outcomes. A research project which addressed how looked after children and young people accessed music opportunities, if at all, what barriers there we In and beyond the care setting: relationships between young people and care workers: A literature review.

many young Blacks to want to go into communications. It is the purpose of this paper to give suggestions for improving educational and professional opportunities for journalism students of color in white universities. In the program, a faculty member of color is.

The definition of looked-after children (children in care) is found in the Children Act A child is looked after by a local authority if a court has granted a care order to place a child in care, or a council’s children’s services department has cared for the child for more than 24 hours.Safeguarding the Welfare of Children and Young People.

Unit 02 – Safeguarding the welfare of children and young people 1. Using the headings provided, briefly describe the key points of each of the following guidelines and legislation.

() and analyse how these guidelines affect the day to day work with young children () The Children act The aim of this act is to simplify the laws.acting as an advocate for Looked After children in order to allow them equal access to educational opportunities and support with important decisions affecting future life chances.

The Designated Teacher will set up systems to monitor and record the progress of all looked after children and.